Find members by call or SKCC number:
Advanced Search

SKCC Home

Founded, January 2006
18,992 members strong
as of 17-Jul-2018

Help keep SKCC free:


How to Contact An Elmer

Many members of the SKCC group volunteer as CW Elmers. It doesn't matter whether you are a new ham just getting interested in Morse or a seasoned veteran looking to explore the world of radio telegraph keying and operation more deeply. As a group, the members listed below bring hundreds of years telegraph experience.

To request help, send an email to one of these members with "Elmer Request" in the subject line. Be sure to tell your Elmer something about yourself: how long you've been a ham; the kind of equipment you have; type of key; any special problems or difficulties you're having learning and using Morse, etc. They, in turn, will contact you with details about how and where to meet on the air for your first session. Afterwards you and your Elmer will agree on a regular schedule and frequency to meet on.

If, after a while, you decide you've gone as far as you care to, or are ready to head off on your own, simply send a thank-you message to your Elmer. It's that easy!

If you would like to be a SKCC Elmer, contact the Elmer manager, Jim, WI9X, at Elmer-Manager@SKCCGroup.Com


SKCC Elmer list

The list is organized by call region for the US and Canada, and by country for DX Elmers. Use the index below to jump to your call region. If your region has no Elmer listed, hunt through the adjacent call areas for alternates. Note: The numeral in a US call may not match the region number if the licensee moved and opted to keep his or her old call.

Call-Region Index

USA Areas:   0 | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | 5 | 6 | 7 | 8 | 9

AUS | BRA |CAN | FRA | ISR | NED | NZL | UK


Region 0

Paul, WA0RST - MN - wa0rse@gmail.com

David, W0YZZ - MO - jmmollus@netscape.net

I was first licensed as WN0YZZ in December 1954. I enjoyed CW, but had problems with it. So in 1955 to keep my call I took and passed my Technician license exam. I spent the next 13 years with success on 50 and 220 MHz AM. Upon moving back to St. Joseph, MO, a Channel 2 town, I had TVI problems. So I bit the bullet and worked on CW. To my surprise it was easier than I thought. I passed the General Class license test and later the Extra. I operate about 85 percent CW and love it. I never became a super-fast CW operator. I enjoy a good QSO at 15 to 18 wpm, but I can go as slow as you want. I work 160 meters through 3/4 meters. I'm retired, so time is no problem. If I can be of any help with CW let me know.

Wayne, KC0PMH - KS - wayne.dillion@gmail.com

I can be available most weekday evenings on most bands except 160. Just drop me an email and I'll try my best to be there. Failing that, call in to the 4SQRP Group's Wednesday evening nets and we'll be happy to welcome you aboard. These nets are designed to be at "comfortable" speeds. I'm NCS for the 40m net at 19:30 Central (00:30z) and 20:30 Central (01:30z) on or around 7.122. God Bless to all, de Wayne

Skip, K1TXU - CO - k1txu@msn.com

I monitor 7.114 MHz most all the time. I call CQ but rarely get an answer. I am not a speed freak. I can usually go at 10 wpm or less. When I first got my license on Nov. 02, 1961, I used CW all the time for the first couple years. Then I got a microphone. Recently, I started using a key again and have a great time with the SKCC. If you want to get together for some CW practice, please let me know.

Top


Region 1

Ethan, KB1WMR - MA - ethan01612@gmail.com

I haven't been a ham for 40 years like the better half of all the other Elmers (or even hams in general), but I know a great deal about ham radio. I just recently got the General ticket, so I have access to 80, 40, 30, 20, and 15 meters. I can send up to 13 wpm, and I will send down to 1 wpm if needed. My schedule is flexible, however I prefer 7:30 p.m. Eastern time or later due to band conditions and school. We will set aside about 30 minute sessions a few days a week until you want to stop and decide you're ready to take on the bands by yourself. Thanks, and I hope to have a QSO with you!

Steve, W1SFR - MA - steverob@shoreham.net

I've had my ticket for about a year and a half now. But I learned CW in the Navy back in the late 60's and worked as a communications tech mostly copying 5 number/letter code groups and feeding them to the crypto guys. Never even occurred to me to become a ham after the war, and until very recently, I was clueless about the hobby. Now I've joined the ranks of the CW nuts and really enjoy it immensely. I can work 80 to 6m and my main and only rig at this time is a KX3 and run CW/QRP all the time. I'm happy to work at any speed that's comfortable and enjoy using my bug, straight key, and sideswiper. I'm retired and free to work just about any schedule. I hold a General class license. I'm looking forward to helping new CW ops learn more about the hobby and how to improve their speed and retention, and most of all have FUN with NO pressure!

73, Steve, W1SFR

Rick, WA1VRP - CT - wa1vrp@yahoo.com

I have been a ham for 38 years. I like to operate at 13 wpm give or take a little. I am able to send down to 5 wpm to help new hams work on their code. I have a 40 meter double bazooka for an antenna, so my most efficient band is 40 meters. But I can tune it on other bands as well with my antenna tuner.

Jim, NM1W - NH - nm1w@arrl.net

Top


Region 2

Larry, W2LJ - NJ - w2lj@verizon.net

Anyone wanting to learn or enhance their Morse skills is more than welcome to send me an e-mail. I'm good at any speed between 5 and 25 wpm. I have capability on all bands, 80 through 10 meters. My operating is limited to the evenings though, usually after 8:00 PM Eastern.

Top


Region 3

Ron, AC2C - MD - ac2c@skccgroup.com

I'm available to help with your Morse-code practice just about any time of day or evening - just give me a day or two to arrange a sked. I use straight keys, bugs, and iambic paddles and can help with practice at speeds up to 18-20 wpm. Even when sending at slower speeds, I prefer to send the individual characters at a more moderate speed and add spacing between the letters -- the Farnsworth method. Let's get together and see what we can do.

Sam, KB3DNZ - PA - kb3dnz@p1s.com

While there are lots of great programs for learning Morse code, nothing beats getting on the air! Straining to hear a faint signal through snaps, pops and static crashes -- and actually getting the message -- can be a real thrill! I'm happy to work with any operator wanting to develop proficient "in the head" copy of the code. I copy 1-35 wpm. Look for me on the SKCC Elmer frequency 7.114 by sending "CQ SKCC ELMER?" and your call. Or send me an email and we'll work out a frequency and schedule. I'll be listening for you!

Ray - WA3PRR - PA - wa3prr@arrl.net

I’ve only been operating CW for a couple years, but it has become my primary mode. I’m good for up to about 12-15 WPM, and I’m more than happy to slow down as necessary; 1 WPM is just fine with me, and I use a straight key or bug exclusively. I was given a lot of help from other members here, and I’d like to give back and help others get started. I’m usually on the sked page in the evenings, or you can get me via email. 73 and good luck!

Tom, WY3H - PA - wy3h@arrl.net

I've been ham more than 25 years. Operate mostly QRP CW, HF and 6 meters. Used straight key almost exclusively for past 5 years and for the majority of time as a ham operator. SKCC Nr. 629; FISTS 11228; Flying Pigs 922; and president and co-founder of the North American QRP CW Club. I am happy to be a part of any organization that is dedicated to fostering and preserving CW and hope all organizations can eventually work together to advance our common goal -- preserving CW. I am most happy for the privilege of helping others hone their CW Skills as I hone my own.

Jim, N3ADF - MD - N3ADF@verizon.net

Larry, AH6AH - MD - lpwmandel@comcast.net

Top


Region 4

Art, W1FJI - FL - w1fji@mail.com

I am 76 years old and on May 5, 2014, I entered my 59th year in ham radio. I have helped a few hams with CW in the past and am currently doing the same for other another ham. CW has always been my first mode and continues to be my first mode of operation. I am not a high-speed cw operator. I can make myself available to help others when necessary. 73, Art, W1FJI

Cliff, K4MLD - VA - k4mld@verizon.net

I first became interested in ham radio in late 1958 and, after being mentored by W4PQK and W4TFZ(SK), was licensed as KN4MLD on Aug 11, 1959 at the age of 14. I am a member of ARRL, QCWA, 10-10, SKCC, The Virginia Phone Net and the Grave Yard Net. I chase DX on CW. I still enjoy building things and do upon occasion. But mostly work CW using a J-38 straight key due to being hard of hearing. I am available on 80-10 including WARC at anytime. I love talking on CW with new hams and I am very patient.

Bill, KA4KSB - NC - ka4ksb@embarqmail.com

I am available any time, anywhere, and can assist and work any speed that you would like. I can work any frequency in the General portion of the band. I can also help with using a bug, straight key, or paddle. Operating CW is my primary love in ham radio. I have also been established as an Elmer and have helped many a ham to improve his or her sending and copying skills.I take CW serious as far as sending and copying.

Frank, KB4T - FL - kb4t@arrl.net

I use straight keys and bugs. I prefer higher-speed operation, so if there are folks who want to practice at higher speeds (eg. 20 wpm.) I'll be glad to work with them. I'm generally available evenings and weekends, plus or minus work. I have Skype (kb4t-fl), which is quite helpful. I can operate on 80, 40, 30, 20, 17, and 15 meters. I recommend the G4FON software which uses the Koch method. I have found the program to be very helpful.

Bill, WA4FAT - AL - wa4fat@wa4fat.com

I've always been an evangelist for our wonderful hobby. I first taught code back in grade school, started a radio club in Junior High, and was a CW instructor in the Navy and then for many years with the local Birmingham Amateur Radio Club. Now I find myself rekindling the joy of CW after a bit of a hiatus from the air, I'm thoroughly enjoying the SKCC camaraderie, and I would be more than happy to give back in any way I can with the SKCC Elmer program. So if anyone should need an encouraging word, a sympathetic ear, or on-air practice, it would be my pleasure to help.

Don, W4BWS - FL - w4bws1@gmail.com

I was licensed in 1955 as KN8AZW. Progressed to K8AZW, General, about 6 months later. Advanced in 1958 and Extra in 2008. Was not a big DXer so no real advantage to Advanced for me.
Studied Electrical engineering at Ohio University and Electronics at Valparaiso Tech Inst. In Indiana. Colleges in 1959 did not teach much electronics. Former callsign - W9FFF from 1960 to 1962 while in Valparaiso, Indiana.
Employed 1960 at TRW Michigan City, Ind. as bench Tech working on TV cameras for NASA sites. Established incoming inspection stations for active electronic parts.
Graduated and employed March 1962 with RCA at Kennedy Space Center.
Transferred to Harris Corp, Melbourne, FL. in June1962. Worked with the Rf Systems Group Engineering( antennas and RF circuits), then Quality Engineering( Contract Assurance, Secure Inspection teams Supervisor, Components Engineering and Vendor Surveillance) and finally Asst Manager Manufacturing in the Printed Circuits Department.
Owned antenna company Skylane Products, Cubical Quads and other antenna designs and manufacturing, until February 1986.
Retired from Harris in February 1986 after the Shuttle Disaster in January 1986. Returned to college and became Doctor in June 1990. Was ordained as Pastor in 1996.
Semi-retired again in 2009 and moved to Ecuador. There had small clinic with natural healing procedures. Moved back to US in May 2016 after the 7.8 earthquake destroyed my home and clinic. I was HC4/W4BWS near Manta. Ecuador.

Jerry, K4KBL - GA - digilink@gmail.com

I first got interested in amateur radio while in the Boy Scouts back in the mid to late 1950's. I earned my novice ticket then technician followed by general and later Advanced class. My initial interest was DX especially while living in Virginia Beach, Va. At that QTH I had a small tower, yagi, SB200 amplifier with a Kenwood TS-520. In total, I have now confirmed 334 entities, But after all those years seems like something was missing from the hobby. I soon began using QRP and CW as my main operating preference and earned WAS QRP.
I'm more of an operator rather than technician these days. I've used Heathkit HW-8 and HW-16's along with the TenTec Argonaut.Now I have the Elecraft K1 and really enjoy SKCC and NAQCC Sprints.
Please don't hesitate to contact me with amateur radio questions. If I don't know the answer I'll try my best to find out the correct response and we'll both learn something new.
Best 73'
Jerry - K4KBL

Ron, W8RDG - MI - grewr@gvsu.edu

I am a retired Senior Chief EM from the USCG living on the West Coast of Michigan running 100 Watts in the Spring through the Holidays and a snowbird in the winter months running QRP from Florida. I have been a ham since the early 1980s. I enjoy CW because it is a challenge a fun way of communication. I look forward to helping anyone I can.
Ron Grew W8RDG
Manistee, Mi (Summer - Fall)
Venice, FL (Winter)

Top


Region 5

Jim, KE5AL - LA - jjs78660@gmail.com

I was first licensed in 1965 as WN0LKM up in Iowa at the tender age of 11. IBM moved me to Austin, Texas in 1980, and I've been in the area since then. I'm now retired, with time for my hobbies. I live near Austin, in the town of Pflugerville. I got my current call, KE5AL, in 1983. I had an Advanced ticket at the time. Although I've since gotten the Extra, I like KE5AL, and kept it. It's a good CW call. By the way, I got one of the last Extras given by an FCC examiner, with the 20 WPM code test.
I work almost exclusively CW. My current rig is a Flex 6300 into a ground mounted vertical. I prefer to send code with a bug or straight key. I work most of the HF bands, except for 160 meters.
I've been an SKCC member for a few years now, and I enjoy the club activities such as the weekend sprintathon held each month. My SKCC number is 12776S, so I'm what they call a Senator.
It seems like most of the folks I work on CW these days are over 65, so we obviously need some new blood to carry on the tradition.
--
Jim Shaffer, KE5AL

Dana, AD5VC - TX - ad5vc@yahoo.com

I got my license in November 2005, after hurricane Katrina. I saw all the good work the hams did there and decided to fulfill a teenage aspiration by getting a license. Being new at this means I am very aware of the on-air nervousness that accompanies your first few tries at CW. Therefore, I particularly like to help new ops get over that hump. I also know that it is hard to spend 5 minutes trying to decode a callsign sent at 18+ wpm and then call them and ask for QRS. The faster ops don't always understand that, even if they are more than willing to slow down. I learned Morse code using computer software, specifically the G4FON trainer. The Koch method with characters at 15+ wpm, but with 5-7 wpm spacing worked for me. You learn one letter, then two, and so on. Humans have innate language skill, and that is what you are using to learn. Educational level is irrelevant. Even now, I continue to practice by either going on the air and trying to copy QSOs, or listen to training software. I send with a straight key, and I strive to send the cleanest, well spaced, code I can.

Bill, K5WG - OK - k5wg@swbell.net

I have been a ham since 1976 and operate almost exclusively on CW. I am available for CW schedules on any amateur band from 160 through 10 meters. I will be glad to operate at whatever speed you request. I have taught several people the Morse code over the years. BTW, I am a retired college professor. I enjoy working with people who want to learn.

Bob, WA5VSK - TX - wa5vsk@gmail.com

I have been a ham for more than 40 years and operate mostly CW. I hold an Extra Class license and have 80-10-meter capability. I will work with anyone at any speed up to 25 wpm. I am good for speeds above 25 wpm, but if one can copy and send correctly at 15-20 wpm there are many avenues available for practice at faster speeds. Let me know if I can help.

Bruce, K5TEN - AR - k5ten@aol.com

I've been a ham since 1981. I was a dedicated Novice until 1985 and love CW, especially on 40 meters. I specialize in helping those who may be hesitant about using CW because of their slow speed. Slow is just fine! I'll help you get some confidence (and some speed!) in no time. I am very much an "old school" CW operator with emphasis on proper pro-signs, procedure, and how to work break-in. I have always been one to leave a tad more in spacing, making it even easier to copy. I can also help you graduate to "ditching the pencil" and start copying in your head. I have a full-sized elevated ground plane 43' vertical on a mountainside and routinely work both coasts during the day as well as at night on 40 meters. Simply email me and we'll work out a sked based on your location, license class, and propagation that is convenient for us both. I mainly have late afternoons and evenings free.

Jim, W5APS - TX - w5aps@yahoo.com

While my code may not be perfect, I can operate at 25-plus wpm. I have no problem slowing down to 5 wpm or less to help someone. At that speed I may be using a keyboard instead of a bug. I have been hamming for around 50 yrs and CW is my favorite mode, even though I do work some of the sound-card modes.

Ron, AF5Q - OK - af5q@arrl.net

I was licensed in 1990, just after the first Gulf War and have had a passion for radios since I was 14. I currently hold Extra -class license and am an ARRL certified instructor. I have taught amateur radio off and on since 1992. I will work with anyone with speeds from just starting out (I don't care how slow) to 20 wpm. I consider Morse code an art and a unique language. I recommend the G4FON software, but I will be more than happy to teach as I can on any band that we can make contact on from 440 all the way down to the "top" band, 160 meters. I look forward to working with you and hope to hear you on the air.

Sam, N5QAB - AR - sambwilliamsjr@yahoo.com

I have been a CW operator since 1956, with a few years off for work. I am available most days on the HF bands and willing to work with hams who want to improve their CW efficiency. I was a radioman in the Navy in the early 1960s and believe strongly in learning to space letters and words properly for good copy. I am interested in helping others as a SKCC Morse Elmer.

Sam, K5SW - OK - k5sw@sbcglobal.net

My Novice experience began in the fall of '51. An announcement over the high school's PA system said the HS Biology teacher Dale Reins W5VJU would conduct code/theory classes in the evening for those interested. I opted for it-learned my code, studied theory as well as building my 1st XMTR,a 6L6 Xtal Osc.(I still have & use that rig, since rebuilt to better chassis on 40 mtrs today).

The nearest exam point was in Tulsa, 60 miles away. I rode the MKT railroad passenger train to Tulsa, walked the 1/2 mile to the basement of the Post Office.

In May of '52 my ticket arrived (Wn5WAX). Locally I found a WW2 surplus BC-342-N receiver. I had one XTAL (3.728) & put up a dipole fed w/72 ohm "twin-lead". Not knowing better I cut the dipole for 40 mtrs & had no more room to make longer I built up a antenna tuner with a "one turn link & bulb" to see my power out. The power supply for the 6L6 rig XFMR came from a 1938 Philco Table model radio (orig. xfmr is still in use). My key was a McElroy Teardrop.

I was a Junior in HS at that time. I would take a nap some evenings & get back up around mid-night & work 'til 2AM, back to bed, & off to school later. On 3.728 in the Novice "Snake-Pit" I worked 33 states from Oklahoma as a Novice.

I consider my Novice experience one of my "Greatest Enjoyment Periods" of my 61 years in Ham Radio. BTW, my Elmer KC5TL ex W5VJU is still alive. One other note-I'm a 2nd generation Ham-Uncle was W5ALI '31-'74. It was in '46 right after hams could get back on air that he quickly built up a ten meter AM rig that I talked to another 11 yr old NJ hams son that I was "hooked on Ham Radio", but lay dormant until the fall '51 announcement on HS PA system.

Wn5WAX--then W5WAX--now K5SW, however I picked back up my W5WAX call in '98 my xyl & I formed a club & I got W5WAX back for it. When using vintage gear I use W5WAX. Lots of vintage still in use here, along with many keys.

I have and use some old tube gear-(1) Drake 2-NT, Drake R4-A with Mc Elroy Key(2) Heath HW-16 and HG-10 VFO with a Vibroplex Bug.(3) 6L6 Xtal Osc. at 7 wts. with the Drake R4-A Rcvr with an old Navy WW2 Key.

Top


Region 6/KH6

Dave, N6XJP - CA - dfairchilds@sbcglobal.net

I have been a ham since around 1989. You can count the number of SSB QSOs I have had on both hands, with fingers left over. I moved from Novice to Extra in about 16 months. Love code. Enjoyed learning it. Enjoy practicing it. Love doing it on the air. My shack is in the Sierra Nevada foothills at 2,500 feet. I can send on 10-15-20-40 meters. I do hang out at all the SKCC freqs, but favor 7.114-7.120 during the day. My antennas support NVIS, so I am probably good for 100-300 miles around central California. Very active in QRP, but can send 100 watts if necessary. Sending and receiving up to about 15-18 wpm, but would love to do 3-8 wpm to help bring folks along. Retired now, best times for me are from 0900-1500 local, but I can adjust to anyone's schedule. 73, Dave

Peter, KO6R - CA - ko6r@arrl.net

I have been hanging out on and around 7.112 MHz and having the time of my life. I've rediscovered the joys of my Novice days, and if I can help someone else to discover all that, I'd be very pleased. A guy I worked during one Novice QSO said that what we were doing was "finger dancing" -- great concept. It's so much more than just talking. It's the mutual enjoyment of someone's fist, their love of "true radio," and more. May I have this dance?

John, KE6K - CA - ke6k@ymail.com

Well I was first licensed in 1963 and passed the general test that same year at the San Fransisco field office. I really wanted to get on 2 meter AM, but my dad wouldn't allow it until we passed the 13 WPM code test. To entice me to operate he bought me a Johnson Speed-X bug, which I still have. By the time I get my general license, CW was my mode of choice and it has been ever since.

I went through the CWop's CW Academy a few years ago because I was stuck at about 20 WPM and couldn't do head copy at all. It took work but I now can do 28-30 WPM although I prefer to QSO at around 20 WPM. I have been facilitating a CW Academy Level 1 class for the last 3 years.

Top


Region 7/KL7, WL7

Jack, AC6FU - NV - ac6fu@sbcglobal.net

I am willing to teach code to anyone who wants to learn. My first license was a Novice-class license, which I received in the fall of 1954. I got my speed up to 15 wpm and got my General-class license the following summer. I spend a lot of time on the straight key around 7.100 to 7.120 MHz looking for new hams.

Russ, K7INA - WA - russfishk7ina@gmail.com

I was first licensed 54 years ago in 1959 and have been active ever since. My favorite mode is CW and I am comfortable with speeds from 5 to 65 WPM. My first Elmer was not a CW operator but he had knowledge to pass on to us "newbies". I believe I have knowledge to pass on to assist others in CW or basic amateur radio operating procedures. Retired Washington State Patrol Sergeant, no family left so I have time to spend in helping others. 73, Russ, K7INA

Andy, N7TP - NV - n7tp@amargosavalley.com

If someone's trying to get up to 5, 10, or 15 wpm then I can help. Anyone wanting to get to 30 or 40 wpm? Well, I'm not the guy. If someone needs some advice on how to operate, I can do that too.

Will, WA7OET - WA - shotgun98198@yahoo.com

I have over 40 years of CW experience. I can copy and send CW from 5 to 45 wpm. I am interested in giving back and see the need for CW mentors who can teach not only the code itself but proper procedure as well.

Dale, WB7DJ - WY - dsjohn@wyoming.com

I've been a ham for 37 years and still enjoy the straight key. I can run up to 15 wpm, but prefer 10-12. I believe in quality over quantity. I use the Farnsworth method. I can operate anywhere except the Extra-class sub-bands and 160 meters. I've been retired for 12 years, so I can make almost any sked. I like to help the new CW ops. 73, Dale, WB7DJ, SKCC 387T

Bob, WL7WH - AK - wl7wh@alaska.net

I am available most any time (retired), and can usually meet anyone's time frame. Band conditions now will make some contacts difficult, but hopefully if you are located on the West Coast there will be no problems.

Ci, WU7R - MT - bpci@aol.com

I try to accommodate the person's schedule and equipment, since my time is flexible and I have several rigs and antennas. I like to try and meet with folks on a daily basis for short (20 minute) QSOs. I find this helps both of use get to know each other. After that initial few months, we usually shift to once or twice a week.

Top


Region 8

Andy, K2OO - OH - thall@thall.net

I have been a CW op for over 40 years and would love to join your Elmer brigade. I am retired, so I can help at almost any hour of the day.

John, K8JD - MI - k8jd@yahoo.com

I live in the Detroit metro area and have a flexible schedule. I have been an active CW Ham since 1961 and use straight keys, bugs and electronic keyers. I have taught classes to prospective hams in clubs and public-school adult-education settings, including Morse training. I have a station capable of giving on-the-air Morse training to local hams as well as distant ones. 73, John, K8JD

Paul, K8PG - MI - pegenaw@charter.net

I have been licensed since 1972. I like to help in all areas of amateur radio. I can help you with the theory of electronics, learning Morse code, or setting up your first station. You can e-mail me, or call me at 906-439-5133. Please leave a message if I am not there.

Charles, KB8BFM - WV - wirephoto@yahoo.com

Back in December 1986 I past my Novice exam with a score of 100 percent. I had the highest score in a novice class a local ham club was holding. I have been a CW freak ever since I made my first contact. Over the years I have help others learn CW If anyone wanting to have a QSO on the air please email me.

Sam, KB8OOM - OH - skeets345@yahoo.com

I have been a ham for 20 years and I love Morse code. I have helped new CW ops in the past (FISTS Code Buddy Program) so I have experience helping new people with Morse code. I am patient and no speed is too slow for me. Most of us started at very slow speeds. I prefer evenings but I can be flexible, since I am retired.

Ray, W8FLX - OH - rhurlbut@columbus.rr.com

I have used CW for nearly 75 years. As W1LWA I was involved with CW traffic nets prior to WWII and participated in many CW contests. I have an ARRL certificate for copying 30 wpm. My traffic handling, contesting, and DXing days have been set aside and I now look forward to good CW chats. I will be glad to help anyone wishing to improve his CW proficiency and speed. I operate in the General portion of 40 meters mostly but can operate on other frequencies. I live in a condo and do not have a very good antenna farm. Some are in the attic, and I have a Hamstick on the patio. Use an email to get started. 73 Ray W8FLX

Tom, K9DAC - OH - twilli1621@aol.com

Tom was born in Neenah, WI, in 1942 and became interested in listening to shortwave stations at a very young age. By the time he was 14, he received his first amateur-radio license (KN9DAC), thanks to a local ham that started taking him to monthly ham club meetings.

Tom has held several calls throughout his movement around the U.S. Besides his current call, he has also held the following: K7TBB, AA7TBB, KD9KR, WD9ARL, and KD8PBV.

Tom is retired from the broadband cable industry, where he held executive level positions in general management and technical operations. He retired at the end of 2010 after 46 years in the industry. He received his MBA in 1998 from Xavier University in Cincinnati.

Tom is an avid CW operator and a member of the A-1 Operators Club from years gone by. He also operated CW traffic nets years ago, where he was net control station for several nets and received a nice quantity of "Brass Pounder League" awards for handling a large amount of CW traffic.

He is able to operate at very QRS speeds as well as high speed up to 40+ wpm. Tom enjoys SKCC and wants others ops to enjoy the wonderful world of cw. He currently lives in Dayton, OH with his wife, Mary. They have 7 children and 19 grandchildren.

Ron, W8RDG - MI - grewr@gvsu.edu

I am a retired Senior Chief EM from the USCG living on the West Coast of Michigan running 100 Watts in the Spring through the Holidays and a snowbird in the winter months running QRP from Florida. I have been a ham since the early 1980s. I enjoy CW because it is a challenge a fun way of communication. I look forward to helping anyone I can.
Ron Grew W8RDG
Manistee, Mi (Summer - Fall)
Venice, FL (Winter)

Top


Region 9

Richard, W9RAC - IN - richard@w9rac.com

I would like to introduce myself, Richard, W9RAC. I have been an amateur operator for 30 years, am active on 40/60/75/160 bands. I do not have VHF or UHF capabilities, but do cover most of HF. I am retired for the last 10 years and am 67 years of age. If you have an interest in learning CW or a practice schedule drop me a line. I am active daily on CW, focusing on accurate quality sounding CW. My practice range can include 5 to 15 WPM. We can QSO daily if you desire, which is the best way to improve your CW, I am flexible on timing. I have a straight key, bug and keyboard for computer quality code if we need to use it initially, with your goal being to get on-air and use your mechanical key. Being in an area closer to mine is an advantage for consistent practice, and on hands help if necessary, we can SSB QSO for tips regarding your practice as well. I hope to hear you soon!
73, Rich
W9RAC, SKCC 16182
WWW.W9RAC.com

Ernie, K9QAG - IL - edbrown3448@att.net

My name is Ernie Brown ... I am known as "Brownie" on the air. I am located in Franklin Park, Illinois ... just west of Chicago.

I was originally licensed in September of 1957. Over the years I spent a lot of time on Morse code and think it is one of the better modes. Today, it is my primary source of communication.

Equipment wise, I never had a rig that ran over 100 watts or an antenna that exceeded an ordinary dipole or vertical. Yet, I have a collection of international QSLs that cover the world. It is because of operating CW that allowed me to reach out with such modest equipment.

Today, I operate an ICOM 718 and a YASEU FT-840 fed into a ground mounted vertical. Even under the rough Sun Spot Cycles I still manage to get through the mess and enjoy my CW QSOs.

I operate mainly 40 meters through 17 meters, but can go on any frequency up to 6 meters. I can work any speed comfortably up to 20 wpm, but speed does not bother me. Accuracy is the important thing.

If I can be any help send me an e-mail and we can set up a time and frequency to practice cw.

Dan, W9DLN - WI - daniel.nyman@waupacafoundry.com

My name is Dan Nyman and I live in Crivitz, WI. I have been a ham since 1977 when first licensed as WD8JTQ. I spent many years as a novice with a HW-16 and one crystal for 7122 kHz. Around 1986 I upgraded to General and then soon to Extra when I became NT9B. By this time I had finally broke down and bought a rig with a VFO. In 2004 I became W9DLN.

I had two mentors help me in my ham career. One was Chuck, WD8KCH. I made my first reluctant QSO on his rig under his encouragement. My other mentor was Harry, W9CNV. Harry would work all over the world with 100W and an inverted vee antenna. Both guys really sold me on the advantages and fun of CW.

Chuck showed me how to send code with one hand and copy with pencil with the other hand. I never did get the hang of that. That was way before computer logging software. I can now send with one hand and type with the other. I think he would be proud. Harry once told me that when you use CW you never run out of things to say even if you use prosigns and abbreviations. I still believe that.

Upon reaching the SKCC's Senator level I have decided to slow down and smell the roses. Becoming an Elmer should be just the ticket. I would like to share my experience with others to help them become better CW operators. I can work any speed up to about 20 WPM with my straight key. If you use a bug we can go faster. I am available most evenings and weekends. I'm not retired and still have a day job. If I can be on any help send me an email or call me at (715) 854-3690.

Jack, KK0I - WI - SaBaiDeePhoto@gmail.com

I am a "renewed" amateur and enjoy CW even more this "second time around." I generally hang around the old Novice portion of the 40 meter band (7.100 - 7.125 MHz) looking for those new and "renewed" CW operators. Fun is the name of the game. Accuracy is what it is about. For early morning people, I'm generally on between 5:00 and 6:30 a.m. Central time during the weekdays (before work) and perhaps a bit longer on the weekends, getting my own CW "fix." I hang around 3.541 MHz on 80 meters and 7.040-7.050 MHz if 80 meters is too noisy. I'm on "old Novice 40" in the evenings. So if you'd like to give it a try, I've certainly got the patience and I'm willing to push you if you want. But you have to let me know, otherwise I'll match your speed. Let's have fun pounding brass together. I use a straight key, a bug, a side swiper, and a paddle, so perhaps we can get you interested in the CW tools other than just a straight key. Send me an email and let's see what we can do. I'll be there.

Curtis, KC9UNL - IL - curtstamp@aol.com

I was licensed in 1968 and was active until the 1990s when I let my license expire due to lack of activity. I got the "bug" back this year and got my license back. I enjoy CW and PSK31. I would like to do something to help new amateurs develop an interest and love for this mode. I am interested in helping others as a SKCC Morse Elmer. Please let me know how I can help you. If you live near me, we can get together in person. Please see QRZ.com for my location.

Top


Top


Australia

Steve, VK7CW - AUS - ntstrom@gmail.com

My experience in Ham Radio started in 1995 and I currently hold a VK Advanced Class License. However I was using CW prior to that in the Australian Army, where I qualified at 22 wpm send and receive.

I joined SKCC in 2013 and I can use all types of keying methods, but really enjoy sending with a bug or sideswiper. I am very active on the bands and operate almost exclusively CW on 160m though to 6m.

I am a FISTS Down Under Code Mate Volunteer and I would be more than happy to assist or provide guidance to CW newcomers or to anyone at any level. More than happy to operate at QRS as required.

I am usually available at most times and can be regularly found on the SKCC sked page during the VK evenings.
73 de Steve VK7CW

Top


Brazil

Dirk, PY2UDB - BRA - dirk.bal@gmail.com

As an active volunteer in Scouting, I am currently training young Scouts to become ham operators. I have trained about 20 youngsters to date. In order to make them comfortable at HF and proficient in CW, I have been training these young operators to learn CW and practice making QSOs starting at QRS-10. I would be very happy to serve as a CW Elmer for Brazil. I can be contacted in English, Portuguese, or Dutch.

Top


Canada

Fred, VE3FAL - ON - flesnick@tbaytel.net

I've been playing with radio since age 12. I learned morse to copy ship-to-shore stations while a teen and using my grandparents' old shortwave receiver. I started operating ham radio at VE3SEC in high school. From there the bug bit and bit hard. I use Morse code 95 percent of the time and run QRP about the same percentage. I operate portable, mobile, and fixed. I can operate all bands from 160-10 meters. I'm a DEC for Amethyst District ARES, SATERN member and liaison officer for Great Lakes Region, CFARS member, FIST, SKCC, and many other groups. My first love has been and will always be CW. You can find my webpage at here. Email me to set up a sked.

Brion, VE3FUJ - ON - ve3fuj@wightman.ca

I use only a straight key for a QSOs (I'm not comfortable using a paddle or bug) and can send up to approximately 18 wpm. Also, I don't mind sending at 5 wpm. My QTH is about 130 km northwest of Toronto, in Harriston, ON. I've been licensed since 1964 with the same call. I like to stick to 40 and 30 meters. I renewed my interest in ham radio operating QRP CW back in 2006, but I can muster 50 watts when I have to.

Jay, VY1JA - YT - vy1ja@arrl.net

Over the period from 1961 to now, I have taught many people how to communicate via CW, including one slow learner who made himself able by sheer determination. You can do this if you really want it. There are tricks to help you learn even if you have a "tin ear". Please contact me if you are as near as just north of Whitehorse, YT, where I live, or as far away as Northern BC, NWT, NU, or AB if you want my help to let you become the CW operator you can imagine yourself becoming. I am retired and can set up schedules to match just about anyone. I send well by hand, always slowing down to the speed of the person on the other end. Almost all of my amateur radio time is spent on CW, and currently with SKCC people and using the SKCC Sked page.

Top


France

Bernard, F5DE - FRA - f5de@wanadoo.fr

I learned CW at 15 and became F5DE in 1964. I have always done CW traffic by pleasure, more than 90 percent on HF and the most possible on VHF. I am QRV from 3.5 to 28 MHz bands. I use about 50 watts and a GP antenna. This is not a very powerful station but powerful enough to do a good QSO depending on propagation. Generally I can be active around 2100 to 2400 UTC. Do not hesitate to ask me for a sked via an e-mail. I can arrange a date/time for a QSO try. This is also possible when I am connected to the SKCC Sked page.

Top

Bert, F6HKA - FRA - f6hka@bbox.fr

I’ve been ham since 1981 and really love CW my main mode of traffic. I use straight keys, bugs, paddle and can help with practice at speeds between 5–30 wpm. As I’m retired I’m very available and connected on sked page almost every day. Don’t hesitate to send a PM or an e-mail. I’m QRV on all bands 160-6m but signal must be strong enough on top band as I don’t have any RX system.

Gerard, F6EEQ - FRA - f6eeq@uft.net

Top


Israel

Aric, 4X4PP - ISR - 4x4pp@walla.co.il

My name is Aric Native. I have been licensed since 1985. Most of the time I work the CW mode, on 6, 10, 12, 15, 17, 20, and 40 meters. I have time and I am prepared to spent time and help anybody as far as the CW mode is concerned. For practice purposes, I am available between 18:00Z and 22:00z. Please feel free to send me e-mails anytime. Any e-mail received will be answered promptly.

Top


Netherlands

Alex, PA1FOX - NL - pa1fox@amsat.org

For more than 22 years, I have known CW, but was to scared to use it. Recognize it? Or just started learning? With the help of the SKCC I managed to conquer it and really enjoy CW now. I would like to Elmer any new or old (re-?)starters and can help you with any speed up to 20 wpm with straight key, sideswiper, or paddles. Apart from using radio we can also practice using internet CW if we can not get our signals through. Skeds around 21:30 to 23:00 UTC would be perfect. Please send me a mail if you need help. Plenty of patience and willingness are waiting here for you!

Top


New Zealand

Stan, ZL2BLQ - NZ - stanola@xtra.co.nz

It would be my pleasure to assist newcomers and others develop their confidence in the use of CW. I can be found most days on 14.051 to 14.055 MHz. Best times are 0200-0300 UTC. I will match any slow CW speeds, because accuracy comes before speed.

Neil, ZL1NZ - NZL - neil@zl1.nz

Top


United Kingdom

Ryan, G5CL - UK - rpike78088@btinternet.com

I used to be a code examiner in greater London prior to abolishing the CW license requirement some years ago. I've tutored on 'RSGB Morse Camps' for those who want to pass the 5 wpm, 12 wpm, and Morse recognition/foundation tests. I've been licensed since 1990 and only use CW at speeds of 5-25 wpm but will quite happily QRS to 3 wpm or whatever is comfortable for you. I only use a straight key and am active most evenings and weekends on 80 or 40 meters.


Top



Banner photos courtesy of Ron Bower, AC2C, and Pete Spotts, WB5BUP.